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Subtle Music That Speaks Loudly

Subtle Music That Speaks Loudly

‘Subtle Music That Speaks Loudly’ A Q&A with Seth Walker By Geoff Gehman   Seth Walker didn’t set out to set his compass straight. The singing, composing guitarist didn’t expect that his latest record, “Gotta Get Back,” released last year by The Royal Potato Family, would be all about getting back to elementals–country blues, blue-eyed ... Read More
 
One Man Guy

One Man Guy

One Man Guy A Q&A with Loudon Wainwright III By Geoff Gehman   “The Man Who Couldn’t Cry” was the first song by Loudon Wainwright III that made me realize that the man has the goods. Released on his 1973 album “Attempted Mustache,” it’s the shaggy saga of a writer whose inability to shed tears ... Read More
 
Squeezing Lemonade from Adversity

Squeezing Lemonade from Adversity

Squeezing Lemonade from Adversity A Q&A with Cruz Contreras Of the Black Lillies By Geoff Gehman  Cruz Contreras specializes in turning scrap metal into sculpture. The founding frontman of the Black Lillies wrote a lively, tail-wagging song, “40 Days and 40 Nights,” about the band’s first tour, a mess of roadblocks and wrong turns. The ... Read More
 
Crowning a Musical Knight

Crowning a Musical Knight

Crowning a Musical Knight A Q&A with Lenie Colacino of The Most Excellent Order of Sir Paul By Geoff Gehman Lenie Colacino grew up in metropolitan and suburban New York in the 1950s and ’60s, a left hander in a right-handed world. An avid New York Yankees fan, he felt a little less odd because ... Read More
 
Caravan of Soul Sirens

Caravan of Soul Sirens

Caravan of Soul Sirens A Q&A with Ina Forsman And Layla Zoe of the Blue Sisters   By Geoff Gehman   Looking for a rousing, arousing, take-no-prisoners performance of “Chain of Fools”? Look no further than the YouTube video of the Blue Sisters putting a serious hurting on Aretha Franklin’s siren song. Ina Forsman, Tasha ... Read More
 
True-Blue Troubadour

True-Blue Troubadour

True-Blue Troubadour A Q&A with Al Stewart   By Geoff Gehman   I became an Al Stewart fan in 1976, the year of “Year of the Cat,” a commercial breakout for him and an aural awakening for me. I was hooked, line and sinker, by his crisply melodic, poetic mini-movies about an ecstatic aviatrix, a ... Read More